British PM May summons ministers to discuss possible military action in Syria

British PM May summons ministers to discuss possible military action in Syria

"We'll be coming out of Syria, like, very soon", he said.

Britain's government weighed the possibility of military action against Syria on Thursday but faced growing scepticism from opposition leaders and deeper divisions in a country still haunted by its role in the US-led invasion of Iraq.

"The chemical weapons attack that took place on Saturday in Douma in Syria was a shocking and barbaric act", May told reporters on Wednesday.

Having pledged to put an end to the dispute over the Russian-held, Japan-claimed chain of islands, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hopes to make progress on the issue in talks with President Vladimir Putin during a visit to Russia next month.

Trump posted a tweet on Wednesday warning Russian Federation to "get ready" because missiles "will be coming" to Syria.

A separate YouGov survey on Thursday found 61 percent of people think it would be necessary for parliament to vote on military action against Syria, with just 18 percent saying it was not necessary and 21 percent undecided.

Echoing the United States stance, France said Assad's government had reached a "point of no return" with repeated use of chemical weapons.

As tensions mount between the USA and Russian Federation over a possible U.S. strike, the Kremlin said a crisis communications link with the United States meant to avoid an accidental clash over Syria was being used by both sides.

He said the USA is still assessing intelligence relating to Syrian President Bashar al Assad's involvement in the attack.

Syria warned that it will have "no other choice" but to defend itself if the West launches military action.

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Britain's Ministry of Defense refused to comment on reports that Royal Navy submarines armed with cruise missiles have been dispatched to within range of Syria.

A United Kingdom -based Syrian monitor says that troops have been emptying airports and bases, while opposition fighters have told Sky News Arabia that government-allied forces have been retreating from some positions and moving equipment.

On Sunday, the day after the attack, the United States president said Russian President Vladimir Putin bore responsibility for the "atrocity" in rebel-held Douma, because of his support for the Syrian government.

The UN Security Council, tasked with maintaining worldwide peace and security, has been riven, with Moscow virulently denying the Douma attack took place, or postulating that it was carried out by rebels.

By supporting Assad, Russia's actions are "prejudicial to our security" and will let the Islamic State group "re-establish itself" - something that "we believe we need to take action to defend", said Pierce.

Earlier in the week, Trump suggested he was committed to ordering strikes in Syria.

British lawmakers voted down taking military action against Damascus in 2013, in what was widely viewed as an assertion of parliamentary sovereignty on the use of force.

It comes after a chemical weapons attack on the rebel-held city of Douma at the weekend, which killed some 70 people and injured up to 500 more.

"We're looking very, very seriously, very closely, at that whole situation", the President said from the Cabinet Room.

Ms. Sanders said Mr. Trump would speak later with French President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Theresa May. Syria has denied carrying out such an attack. The sites reportedly include "two Syrian airfields, a research center and a chemical weapons facility".

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