Wild Monkeys are spreading Herpes to people, researchers alert

Wild Monkeys are spreading Herpes to people, researchers alert

Florida wildlife officials responded to the study with vows to remove macaque monkeys from Silver Springs and other parts of the state.

Non-native rhesus macaques in Florida's Silver Springs State Park have tested positive for herpes B, a potentially fatal disease that is spread through bodily fluids and may be transmissible to humans.

The researchers estimate that up to 30% of the scores of Florida's feral macaques could be active carriers of herpes B, and in an environment where frequent interaction between animals and humans occur, there is high potential for scratches and bites.

The issue has actually not yet been fully studied.

McHV-1, which is also known as herpes B or monkey B virus, is carried by several species of macaque monkeys, which are thought to be a "natural host" for the virus, according to the CDC.

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"When it occurs, it can bring about serious mind harm or demise if the patient isn't dealt with quickly", a CDC rep says in an announcement. Their contacts with the public, including last summer when the monkeys chased a family, have made them somewhat notorious critters and have caused two partial park closures since 2016.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission did not expand on what particular administration strategies the state may utilize, however a rep said the commission underpins freeing the condition of the obtrusive animals. In response to this public health threat, Florida state wildlife managers are proposing the removal of the macaques from their adopted habitats. They are also excellent reproducers, and so soon enough there were a lot more monkeys roaming the region. Of those, 21 died from the disease. Still, he said, while the research confirms the presence of the virus in the monkeys' bodily secretions, more work needs to be done to establish how much virus there is, and how easily transferable it is. They had contracted it through monkey bites and scratches, according to the CDC.

Human visitors to the park are most likely to be exposed to the disease, and any contact with the monkeys' saliva, urine, or feces could lead to contraction. Macaques have released to the Sunshine State's Silver Springs State Park as a tourist attraction almost 100 decades back.

About 175 free-roaming rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) inhabit the park, descended from a population of around a dozen animals that were released in the 1930s to promote local tourism.

While there are no official statistics on monkey attacks on humans in the park, a state-sponsored study in the 1990s found 31 monkey-human incidents, with 23 resulting in human injury between 1977 and 1984.

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